Like a Badiment
He explains why non-profits would have no trouble running a transit system (they already dip into sectors that traditionally fall under the public domain, such as schools and hospitals). He also makes clear why this “non-profitization” is preferable to privatization (basically: less fear of profit-gouging).

postarcadenp:

Anita Sarkeesian is back with the latest video in her Feminist Frequency series, Tropes vs. Women in Video Games, which explores the Damsel in Distress element in video games. 

If you’re not watching this video series, you should be. 

I can hardly express how much I love broken gifs. There’s something about them that I can just watch for hours.

I can hardly express how much I love broken gifs. There’s something about them that I can just watch for hours.

transportationnation:

Can Twitter reunite owners with stolen bikes? The SFPD hopes so.
(via SF Police Turn to Twitter to Reunite Owners with Stolen Bikes)

transportationnation:

Can Twitter reunite owners with stolen bikes? The SFPD hopes so.

(via SF Police Turn to Twitter to Reunite Owners with Stolen Bikes)

rifflescifi:

edwardspoonhands:

thisfeliciaday:

Great music video!

Nothing to Prove - Geek Girls & The Doubleclicks (by thedoubleclicks)

I love the DoubleClicks

Yay Geek Girls!

Looking for a new SFF book? Check out these!

theatlantic:

The Future of Transportation: Own an EV, Get Access to an SUV

The future of the car could well be small, cheap-to-operate electric vehicles for the workaday commute and a sports car or SUV whenever you want one.
Read more.

theatlantic:

The Future of Transportation: Own an EV, Get Access to an SUV

The future of the car could well be small, cheap-to-operate electric vehicles for the workaday commute and a sports car or SUV whenever you want one.

Read more.

theatlantic:

The Great Wall of Texas: How the U.S. Is Repeating One of History’s Great Blunders

Before their empire fell, the Romans built walls.
They began by erecting barriers along the border following the death of the Emperor Trajan in 117 A.D., notably Hadrian’s Wall, which belted Britain. Later emperors erected internal walls, even around the great city itself, to ward off barbarians. After 300 A.D., the Emperor Diocletian effectively converted the entire Roman populace into feudal serfs, walling them off from internal movement in a vain effort to stabilize the chaotic economy.
Despite the cautionary tale of Rome, building walls, both literal and figurative, has remained a habit of great powers in decline — the fateful course taken not only by Ming China, but also Soviet Russia, and even Great Britain.
Sadly, many Americans are all too eager to repeat history.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

The Great Wall of Texas: How the U.S. Is Repeating One of History’s Great Blunders

Before their empire fell, the Romans built walls.

They began by erecting barriers along the border following the death of the Emperor Trajan in 117 A.D., notably Hadrian’s Wall, which belted Britain. Later emperors erected internal walls, even around the great city itself, to ward off barbarians. After 300 A.D., the Emperor Diocletian effectively converted the entire Roman populace into feudal serfs, walling them off from internal movement in a vain effort to stabilize the chaotic economy.

Despite the cautionary tale of Rome, building walls, both literal and figurative, has remained a habit of great powers in decline — the fateful course taken not only by Ming China, but also Soviet Russia, and even Great Britain.

Sadly, many Americans are all too eager to repeat history.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

nationalpostsports:

‘You’re never going to be a looker’: Wimbledon champion unfazed by BBC announcer’s sexist comments
A glance at the list of men’s singles champions at Wimbledon the last dozen years reveals plenty of pleasant-enough looking chaps, though not a single slam-dunk male model in the bunch.

No matter. Each one was instantly fawned over the moment he held the trophy aloft, celebrated for toughness, smarts and the kind of devotion that knows no quit.

Marion Bartoli displayed all of those qualities — and more — on the way to winning Wimbledon in this most tumultuous of years. But because she’s a woman, at least one man behind a microphone couldn’t stop there. (Photos: Mike Hewitt/Getty Images, Eamonn M. McCormack/Getty Images, Glyn Kirk/AFP/Getty Images, Julian Finney/Getty Images, Stefan Wermuth/The Associated Press)

nationalpost:

Split but together: Divorced couples finding novel ways to live under the same roof for their children’s sake
Monica McGrath and Kent Kirkland are divorced parents of two young children. They live in one house with their children, call themselves friends and borrow sugar from one another.

The Edmonton family gained Canada-wide recognition this month after media attention turned to their family set-up and living arrangements. Part of this attention was due to their custom-built “transporter” house, with two separate sides and a hallway connecting them, but also because they’re doing what many separated couples say they want to do; put the kids first.

“I still consider us a family. We have kids together, we’re still connected,” says Ms. McGrath of her ex-husband. “We need to together raise our kids, no matter what our situation is. This home allows us to do that.”

Their family model is a version of a “bird’s nest” arrangement where children stay in the house, while separated or divorced parents come to them. Some see this as a model that helps minimize disruption for children. It means they don’t have to be uprooted, trekking from one parent’s house to another’s on a regular basis. Although this model is still rare, experts say it has become increasingly common over the last 10 years. (Photo: Walter Tychnowicz for National Post)